Next time you are in Old Navy, Office Depot, Dick’s Sporting Goods or Home Depot ask yourself, “Why am I being encouraged to eat at a store that has nothing to do with food?”
 

Once it is pointed out to you it’s everywhere:  Snacks and sugary beverages in check-out lanes of retailers who do not sell food.

This post is NOT about asking retailers to change their marketing practices. I see that as a pointless exercise. My end-game in nutrition has always been to inform the consumer to be alert to these trends in food and to become smarter.

This is a good place to start.

Part of my presentation on mindfulness regarding food is to become aware of America’s snacking culture and to learn that we are constantly reminded to snack. When people question America’s obesity crisis they often look to fast foods and large portions. While these contribute greatly I think it is our snacking culture and love for sugary beverages that trip us up.

The patients I counsel are mostly doing well at mealtimes. When I question these patients about their beverage choices and snacking habits the picture comes into better focus. We can’t change what we don’t acknowledge.

A photo is worth 1,000 words. Next time you are in Old Navy, Office Depot, Dick’s Sporting Goods or Home Depot ask yourself, “Why am I being encouraged to eat at a store that has nothing to do with food?” Become an informed consumer and listen to your hunger and satiety cues. Reject the urge to snack on junk and sugary beverages.